Concerned? We Should Be! Unshackled from Coalition partners, Tories get ready to push radical agenda

Unshackled from Coalition partners, Tories get ready to push radical agendanoam-chomsky-political-quote-how-the-world-worksStreet Democracy writes:

Our Tory ‘iron fists of blue’ have legalised mechanisms of closing avenues of democracy, obliterating the ordinary strength of the people, ripping the pathways of voice and criminalising the echo’s of dissent.
‘Soulless suits of blue’ with deliberate fierce hosting over the years was shocking enough. Now their chains are loose, corporate heads remain hidden, power given by seemingly legitimate ‘rig free’ voting system, the chill is in the air of ice blue and it’s settled nicely.
Devoid of moral fibre we shall experience ferocious economic cuts for the poor, disabled, the welfare state, nhs and all those within the lower end of society, while we watch the embracing and supporting of the oligarchs furthering legalised money trafficking from the wealth of the nation to the concentrated few and their pockets.

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The Tories ‘Austerity Package’ just meant financially starve the welfare state, then when it collapses hand it over to the oligarchs. Job well done! By Debbie Simmons-Street Democracy

It is clear democracy, the ‘trickle down’ effect has failed, or it hasn’t started ever where the wealthy didn’t control it. Democracy is still a good idea for us to pursue, we just have a ‘different’ kind of democracy, one where the oligarchs control government and defend their own economic interests.
By Debbie Simmons-Street Democracy
new Sunday 10th May 2015 at 09:54 By David Icke

‘David Cameron will use the Conservative Party’s first majority in the House of Commons for nearly 20 years to “deliver” on a radical agenda to cut welfare, shrink the size of the state and re-define Britain’s relationship with Europe.

Conservative insiders said Mr Cameron would move to the right to consolidate support among his backbench MPs after five years of compromise with the Liberal Democrats.

Among Mr Cameron’s first legislative priorities will be to enshrine an EU referendum into law, bring in the so-called ‘snoopers charter’ to give police greater powers to monitor internet communications and give English MPs a veto over legislation only affecting England. The Tories also intend to publish plans to scrap the Human Rights Act within their first 100 days. All proposals had been previously blocked by the Lib Dems.’

Read more: Unshackled from Coalition partners, Tories get ready to push radical agenda

Welfare reforms, food banks, malnutrition and the return of Victorian diseases are not coincidental, Mr Cameron

Welfare reforms, food banks, malnutrition and the return of Victorian diseases are not coincidental, Mr Cameron By 

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The coalition will leave more debt than all Labour governments since 1900. The current government is now responsible for £517 billion of the trillion-plus-pound UK public debt, compared to £472 billion accrued during the 33 years Labour led the country since the turn of the twentieth century.

And the figures look even worse when you adjust for inflation. When you do that, the Coalition’s share jumps to nearly half of the total debt.

But the Coalition don’t meet any public’s needs, they simply serve the wants of  apowerful, wealthy elite. Labour invested in public services, the Tories have bled them dry. So, what have they done with the money? Because the public have seen only austerity cuts. And the most vulnerable bear the brunt of the cuts.

Oxfam’s director of campaigns and policy, Ben Phillips, said: “Britain is becoming a deeply divided nation, with a wealthy elite who are seeing their incomes spiral up, while millions of families are struggling to make ends meet.”

“It’s deeply worrying that these extreme levels of wealth inequality exist in Britain today, where just a handful of people have more money than millions struggling to survive on the breadline.”

Diseases associated with malnutrition, which were very common in the Victorian era in the UK, became rare with the advent of our welfare state and universal healthcare, but are they are now are making a reappearance.

NHS statistics indicate that the number of cases of gout and scarlet fever have almost doubled within five years, with a rise in other illnesses such as scurvy, cholera, whooping cough and general malnutrition. People are more susceptible to infectious illness if they are under-nourished.

In 2013/14, more than 86,000 hospital admissions involved patients who were diagnosed with gout – an increase of 78 per cent in five years, and of 16 per cent on the year before. Causes of gout include a lack of vitamin C in the diet of people who are susceptible, drinking alcohol (beer and spirits in particular) and a lack of a balanced diet generally.

The figures from the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) show a 71 per cent increase in hospital admissions among patients suffering from malnutrition – from 3,900 admissions in 2009-10 to 6,690 admissions in 2013-14.

Cases of scarlet fever admitted to hospital doubled, from 403 to 845, while the number of hospital patients found to be suffering from scurvy also rose, with 72 cases in 2009/10 rising to 94 cases last year.

The figures also show a steep rise in cases diagnosed with cholera, a water-borne disease which was extremely prevalent in the 19th century, causing nearly 40,000 deaths.

While total numbers remain low, the 22 cases last year compare with just 4 in 2009/10, the statistics show.

Dr Theresa Lamagni, Public Health England’s head of streptococcal infection surveillance, said the total number of notifications of scarlet fever this year has already reached 12,580 cases – the highest since 1970.

Cases of measles in hospital rose, from 160 to 205 cases, with a small rise in admissions for whooping cough, from 285 to 289 cases over the five years examined.

The figures on malnutrition follow a series of scandals of care of the elderly, with doctors, remarkably, forced to prescribe patients with drinking water or put them on drips to make sure they do not become severely dehydrated.

Charities have warned that too many patients are being found to be malnourished after being admitted to hospitals from care homes, as well as from their own homes.

However, Labour have said the figures a national scandal.

Luciana Berger MP, Labour’s Shadow Public Health Minister, said: “This shouldn’t be happening in 21st century Britain and the Government’s response is hopelessly complacent.

“People are living under greater pressure and struggling with the cost of living”.

“Hundreds of thousands are forced to turn to food banks and sadly it’s unsurprising people are eating less, and eating less healthily too”.

“David Cameron needs to listen to what the experts are saying and tackle the cost of living crisis that is driving people into food poverty.”

Cases of malnutrition have been steadily increasing since the 2010 general election.

In 2009/10 there were 3,899 hospital admissions for this, in 2010/11 there were 4,660, in 2011/12 there were 5,396 then in 2012/13 this had risen again to 5,594.

People unable to feed themselves adequately needing hospital admission saw a significant rise to 6,686,  where malnutrition was the primary or secondary diagnosis during 2013/14.This is a rise of 71 per cent from 3,899 in the year up to April 2010.

Chris Mould, chief executive of the Trussell Trust which runs a nationwide network of food banks, said: “This shows increases in diseases related to poverty and that’s alarming.

“Our food banks see tens of thousands of people who have been going hungry, missing meals and cutting back on the quality of the food they buy.

“We know quite a large proportion of the population are struggling to get nutritious food on the table. And at the extreme end of that you get people who are malnourished”.

“We don’t believe anyone should have to go hungry in the UK”.

“The scale of the increases we’re seeing must be further investigated to find out why this is happening”.

Scurvy is a disease associated with pirates stuck at sea for long periods – has increased by 31 per cent in England since 2010. This is caused by a lack of vitamin C and is usually due to an inadequate diet without enough fresh fruit and vegetables.

Figures from January this year from the NHS indicate that there were 833 hospital admissions for children suffering from Rickets – a condition which is caused by a lack of Vitamin D, from 2012-13. Ten years ago, the figure was just 190.

The disease, which causes softening of the bones and permanent deformities, was common in 19th century Britain but was almost eradicated by improvements in nutrition. The body produces vitamin D when it is exposed to the sun, but it’s clear that adequate diet plays an important role, too, since the decline of Rickets happened at a time when we saw an improvement in the diets of the nation as a whole.

It is thought that malnutrition is the main cause, children are most at risk if their diet doesn’t include sufficient levels of vitamin D.

Low incomes, unemployment and benefit delays have combined to trigger increased demand for food banks among the UK’s poorest families, according to a report commissioned by the government and released earlier this year,

The report directly contradicts the claim from a government minister that the rise in the use of food banks is linked to the fact that there are now more of them. It says people turn to charity food as a last resort following a crisis such as the loss of a job, or problems accessing social security benefits, or through benefit sanctions.

The review emerged as the government comes under pressure from church leadersand charities to address increasing prevalence of food poverty caused by welfare cuts. The End Hunger Fast campaign called for a national day of fasting on 4 April to highlight the issue.

The report was written by  food policy experts from the University of Warwick, and it was passed to ministers in June 2013 but had remained undisclosed until February 2014, creating reasonable speculation that the government suppressed its findings.

Examining the effect of welfare changes on food bank use was not a specific part of its remit, and the report is understood to have undergone a number of revisions since early summer, ordered by the Department for Food and Agriculture and the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

The researchers found that a combination of rising food prices, ever-shrinking incomes, low pay, increasing personal debt, and benefit payment problems meant an increasing number of families could not afford to buy sufficient food.

In a letter to the British Medical Journal, a group of doctors and senior academics from the Medical Research Council and two leading universities said that the effect of Government policies on vulnerable people’s ability to afford food needed to be “urgently” monitored.

The group of academics and professionals said that the surge in the number of people requiring emergency food aid, a decrease in the amount of calories consumed by British families, and a doubling of the number of malnutrition cases seen at English hospitals represent “all the signs of a public health emergency that could go unrecognised until it is too late to take preventative action”.

The health specialists also said:“Access to an adequate food supply is the most basic of human needs and rights”.

The authors of the letter, who include Dr David Taylor-Robinson and Professor Margaret Whitehead of Liverpool University’s Department of Public Health, say that they have serious concerns that malnutrition can have a long-lasting impact on health, particularly among children.

Tory ministers have repeatedly insisted that there is no “robust link” between the welfare reforms and rising food bank use, whilst welfare minister Lord Freud claimed the rise in food bank use was because there were more food banks and because the food was free.

It ought to be noted, not least by the government, that people may only access food banks when they are referred by a professional agency, such as social services, the DWP or a Doctor. In particular, vouchers for emergency food parcels tend to be given by benefits officials.

In all but exceptional cases, Trussell Trust food banks will only issue a food parcel to someone with a voucher from an accredited agency. Claimants are limited to emergency aid on three occasions only. This indicates that need, rather than availability, is the key reason for the increased use of food banks since 2010.

Together with the pressure created by rising prices and falling wages, there has been a marked increase in demand for emergency food aid since the welfare reforms came into effect. And this is affecting both people in and out of work.

More than half of people who have visited a food bank since April were referred because of social security problems.

The Government claimed the rapid increase in malnutrition cases “could be partly due to better diagnosis”.

I don’t imagine that it’s likely that Doctors have suddenly become better at diagnosis since 2010.

I do, however, think there is much scope for improvement in the capacity of Tory ministers for understanding correlation, basic cause and effect and simple connections.

However, Tory skills in mendacity, creating diversions and ad hominem are second to none.

 

See also:

Poverty

 An email to authoritarian Tory MPs Charlie Elphicke, Priti Patel and Conor Burns

Quantitative Data on Poverty from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

430835_148211001996623_1337599952_n (1)Thanks to Robert Livingstone for his excellent illustrations of t

Art attack on Coalition policies that drive people to their deaths

Art attack on Coalition policies that drive people to their deaths – @MidWalesMike

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A UK artist has created an art installation as a memorial to the suicide victims of welfare reform.

Melanie Cutler contacted Vox Political regarding her piece – ‘Stewardship’ – a few weeks ago, asking, “Do you think I’ll be arrested?”

The response was that it should be unlikely if she informed the media. The artworks have been displayed at the Northampton Degree Show and are currently at the Free Range Exhibition at the Old Truman Brewery building in Brick Lane, London, which ends tomorrow (June 30).

Entry is free and the installation will be located in F Block, B5.

“I have become an artist later on in life,” Melanie told Vox Political. “I was a carer for my son and, a few decades later, my father. I have worked most of my life too, raising three children.

“Only recently, while studying fine art at University I found my health deteriorating. I have a cocktail of conditions – Type 1 diabetes (diagnosed last year), Coeliac disease, asthma, rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis (currently being investigated), osteoarthritis, psoriasis and a brain tumour (thankfully benign and inactive). I have also lived with depression for almost all my adult life.

“I wanted my work to articulate how I feel about certain issues. In March this year I pitched up in Thurrock, a marginal seat which will be hotly fought-over in the run-up to the next general election. I sat in front of a blank canvas and asked the people of the town to tell me how they felt about welfare reform, the press and the 2015 General Election. I took a team of people to film and photograph the event and to explain to people what the work was about.

'People of Thurrock' in the making. Artist Melanie Cutler sits, silenced, while residents of Thurrock write their opinions of 'welfare reform' on the canvas.

“Buoyed on by the reaction to ‘People of Thurrock’, I went on to something else I felt was an important issue; I put welfare reform under the microscope and conducted research around this issue. I was struck by the amount of people who, through no fault of their own, seek to end their own lives as they feel they have no other option. My own family has been touched by suicide and one of my own children is on ESA and awaiting an interview with ATOS.”

'Stewardship': Each plaque features the name of a 'welfare reform' victim and a description of how they died.

'Stewardship': This memorial is to Paul Reekie, the Scottish poet and writer who took his own life in 2010. Letters left on his table stated that his Housing Benefit and Incapacity Benefit had been stopped. The poet's death led to the creation of the Black Triangle Anti-Defamation Campaign in Defence of Disability Rights.

Bedroom Tax- Defend Council Housing-Latest From The Press…

Latest From The Press…click here for: Defend Council Housing. Pictures displayed by Street Democracy

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18/06/14 Bedroom tax fundamentally flawed, Cambridge University experts reveal

17/06/14 Council homes chat

13/06/14 SHOUT campaign ready for lift-off

31/05/14 Bedroom tax inflicted on disabled child

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24/05/14 Buy to let landlords a disaster for Britain and economy

22/05/14 Shelter: 4000 households risk losing homes each week

22/05/14 Court battles against bedroom tax can be won

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21/05/14 Bedroomm tax fails to address under-occupancy, landlords warn

20/05/14 Cameron may rethink Help to Buy as prices soar

20/05/14 Cable: booming house prices causing real worry

20/05/14 Millions face prospect of home ownership ‘debtor’s prison’

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14/05/14 Bedroom tax challenge for children with care needs

13/05/14 Majority of councillors agree first time buyers cannot afford to buy

13/05/14 Playing politics with housing waiting lists

12/05/14 In-work housing benefit claims soar

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Government considering new rules for universal credit

Government considering new rules for universal credit By Inside Housing-pictures displayed by Street Democracy

Some ‘trusted’ landlords may receive benefits direct at an earlier stage

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Displayed by Street Democracy

Government officials are considering altering universal credit to allow ‘trusted’ social landlords to receive vulnerable tenants’ benefit direct before they fall into arrears.

The Department for Work and Pensions, the National Housing Federation and around 20 social landlords are discussing a scheme to allow some housing associations and councils to apply for benefit to be paid directly to them at an earlier stage.

Landlords have warned that universal credit, which replaces a range of benefits with a monthly payment, will threaten their incomes because some tenants will be incapable of managing their finances and fall into arrears.

True Tory British Values: Man forced to live on FLOUR & WATER – woman forced to stop chemotherapy

Man forced to live on FLOUR & WATER – woman forced to stop chemotherapy 

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A true psychopath following an out of touch psychopathic Tory main frame is the career path of Iain Duncan Smith.

Street Democracy writes:

 

The Tory British values are the darkest societal values of our modern day age.

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A fair and just British Tory infrastructure and social system, that steals wealth from the ordinary man and woman and destitute’s the poor all at the same time.

 

Allowing the poorest citizens not only to be socially cast out of main stream society, spitefully demonised as useless eaters, scroungers and other cruel name calling, but financially devastated beyond destitute for all those unable to work a full week.

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It is beyond scandalous how MP’s can excessively over use their expenses by millions of pounds heavily funded from the taxpayer and yet at the same time produce inept and slow kill policies towards the pittance of money awarded by the benefits sector.

They are malevolent policies empowered by human drones in suits who administer such brutal social policies within the benefit system.

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Sitting comfortably behind their overused battered desks they give these policies the undeserving power it needs to survive and operate, like some toxic rampage, they unleash these heartless policies to the most poorest people.

Unwittingly they reconfigure our culture to further impoverish the poor as acceptable without thinking if their position is morally right to inflict such financial pain.

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Localising financial blackmail, standardising impoverishment and amplifying misery by work programme enslavement.

Benefit agents and their colleagues within Work Programmes dig new pathways of magnificent tragedies, and this is one of many.

In Crawley I know of families where the working parent is too ill to work and is being penalised heavily forcing her to miss meals and encourage her to a new level of debt around her neck.

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The Tories unwarranted prejudice against the unemployed, their drivel of spiteful name calling is seemingly lapped up by legions of no empathy low level civil servants who don’t recognise ‘enslavement and financial blackmail’ when its right in front of them.

For more on this horrendous story, click here or continue reading further for more: 

Man forced to live on FLOUR & WATER – woman forced to stop chemotherapy 

13 Jun 2014 — Richard Bristow, the manager of Poole Citizens Advice, cited a case where a man with learning disabilities was living on a paste made from flour and water after his benefits were suspended and another where a woman with Breast Cancer was forced to stop #chemotherapy because she was assessed as ineligible for benefits. He told the audience at Bournemouth University that CAB staff regularly saw Bournemouth and Poole residents who were facing an endless battle to make ends meet.http://t.co/NeuKQJg3P9

Man living on flour and water and woman forced to stop chemotherapy - battle residents face revealed at poverty summit

Man living on flour and water and woman forced to stop chemotherapy – battle residents face revealed at poverty summit

http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk

Man living on flour and water and woman forced to stop chemotherapy – battle residents face revealed at poverty summit 6:20am Thursday 12th June 2014 in News By Melanie Vass SUMMIT: Guest speakers Reverend Clare Downing, with Richard Bristow and Tom Papworth…

CONTROVERSIAL changes to the welfare system are forcing vulnerable people in Bournemouth and Poole to make life-changing decisions, a poverty summit has heard.

Richard Bristow, the manager of Poole Citizens’ Advice Bureau, cited a case where a man with learning disabilities was living on a paste made from flour and water after his benefits were suspended and another where a woman with breast cancer was forced to stop chemotherapy because she was assessed as ineligible for benefits.

He told the audience at Bournemouth University that CAB staff regularly saw Bournemouth and Poole residents who were facing an endless battle to make ends meet.

He said: “Some aspects (of the benefit system) appear to penalise anybody who requires help from the state.

“The bedroom tax in particular is having an insidious impact, especially when there’s no accommodation people can move into.

MPs claim more than £5m in ‘housing benefit’ expenses

MPs claim more than £5m in ‘housing benefit’ expenses by Inside Housing

Pictures displayed by Street Democracy.

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254 MPs are claiming more in expenses to pay their rent than the maximum someone in Westminster can claim in housing benefit, research by Generation Rent shows.

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In total, taxpayers paid more than £5 million in 2013 to rent second homes for 335 MPs with constituencies outside London. Half of them claimed more than £1,675 a month in rent, and the biggest rent claim was for £2,467 a month. Monthly rent for the typical London household is £1,300. The highest rent claim, for £2,467 per month, was by North Antrim MP Ian Paisley.

A spokesperson from Generation Rent said: ‘Just living in a rented house doesn’t make an MP an expert on private renting. Because it’s not their money they have no idea what it’s really like to see half your income eaten up by rent, or scrimp together the fees involved in moving home. And because the allowance is so generous, they can afford the type of accommodation most private renters can only dream about.

‘We don’t object to the second home allowance, but if MPs realised how privileged they are compared to other private renters, they might finally take some action to improve a housing system that is failing millions.’

Independent comments:

They would all fit into the many spare rooms within Buckingham Palace. A short walk from the commons. Secure with excellent facilities. Already funded by the taxpayer so effectively doubling the saving. An obvious option really in these austere times when benefit claimants who are not MPs or members of the Aristocracy have to pay the bedroom tax. As well as find the costs of these poor MPs……..

Is Shapps still fuming at being blocked from getting his own little snout into this trough, or did he find a way around his own admission that his constituency home was such a short commute to the commons?

Whilst the more deserving MPs, as opposed to the feckless something for nothing brigade like those in the Home Counties, need a London base if for no other reason than to follow their right to a family life, it is time that the basic allowance allowed for this so they at least could understand the value of the costs they need to meet, like the rest of us. That way they may rethink how they let out their ex-Council Homes for Market Rents to cash in on the Benefits Cash Cow they created.

The likes of Shapps, leading the division of society into deserving and undeserving have opened a Pandora’s Box that will be the ruin of us all.

Perhaps if the grinning money grabber were to apologise and commit to uniting communities instead there may be a gradual restoration of trust. Otherwise, the outcome is frightening.

Will bedroom Tax cost £1bn per year MORE to the taxpayer ?

Will bedroom Tax cost £1bn per year MORE to the taxpayer ? by SPeye Joe (Welfarewrites)

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Pictures by Street Democracy.

Late this afternoon Inside Housing published a report called “Survey finds more than a third of bedroom tax-hit tenants in arrears”  An eye-catching headline which outlines a research report by just council landlords experiences.

This being an Inside Housing article the report does not say  what the arrears levels were before the bedroom tax came in and thus negates the headline as just an ‘eye-catcher’ and not related to the content of the article!

The real issue in this article is what is presented almost as a throwaway line in the middle of the article:

The survey also found a significant rise in the number of landlords resorting to court action, 55 per cent, compared to just 2 per cent when members were last surveyed in June 2013.

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The language does not emphasise the fact that the number of council and quasi-council landlords (ALMOs) issuing court actions against their tenants has risen from 2% of them to 55% of them – THAT IS A TWENTY SEVEN FOLD INCREASE or in very simple terms like your yearly salary increasing from £20k to £550k per year!  It is a quite astronomical increase.

Yet it is what this means that is the huge issue.  If over 27 times more council tenants are being hit with court actions then there is going to be a hell of a lot more council tenants getting evicted and shortly.

That inevitable increase in eviction of council tenants because of the bedroom tax and it is inevitable is a direct cost to the taxpayer that has to be set against any claimed savings to the taxpayer the DWP claim it ill have.  There is no doubt there is a huge correlation between the two.  So how much does an evicted tenant cost the councils becomes the question.

Inside Housing earlier in the month provided an estimate of how much each eviction costs a local council and the overall yearly cost of eviction to councils and I quote: –

Tenants on the verge of eviction are being helped to remain in their homes by a recently formed social enterprise that is saving their landlords significant sums in the process. Daniel Douglas finds out how

Aadil Ismail* speaks four languages fluently; Arabic, Bengali, Hindi and Urdu. He can recite vast swathes of the Quran verbatim. His house in Bethnal Green is crammed with shelves upon shelves of books. But for six months, his kitchen cupboards were bare and he had no money to eat.

Mr Ismail, a mild-mannered, intelligent 54-year-old man, could easily have been one of the116,000 households across the UK who turned to their councils for help last year because they were homeless, costing local authorities more than £1 billion every year.

Simple maths and divide £1bn by 116,000 cases and you get an average cost of £8,620 per case. So given the average bedroom tax per year is £760 we can see that an eviction cost equates to 11 YEARS BEDROOM TAX TO THE TAXPAYER!

For more on this click here for: SPeye Joe (Welfarewrites)

The bedroom tax discriminates against the social tenant

The bedroom tax discriminates against the social tenant by SPeye Joe (Welfarewrites)

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Pictures displayed by Street Democracy.

I did not emphasise the real issue when I reported on the Wirral MBC case a day or so ago choosing to seek permission directly from the Upper Tribunal to appeal against a bedroom tax case with a room measuring 36.53 square feet.  My error was in focusing on the decision taken and not what the decision meant as the REAL issue is the overt discrimination the social tenant suffers in the bedroom tax policy and this specific case highlights the general discrimination which is deserving of much more attention than the ridiculous decision Wirral MBC has taken.

In short if a private landlord had attempted to rent out the 36.53 square feet room as a bedroom then: –

  1. The private landlord would not be allowed to deem this room a bedroom, and
  2. Would not receive the higher HB towards rent – a 3 bed rather than a 2 bed HB payment
  3. Likely to be prosecuted (and knowing the facts of this case they would be)

YET because it is a social landlord the tenant gets persecuted and hit with the bedroom tax deduction and that is discriminatory and this case highlights this general discrimination in the bedroom tax policy.

The issue gives rise to further room size bedroom tax appeal arguments and potentially a judicial review of the policy itself and that is where the emphasis should have been.  It comes about for a few reasons and it is useful to compare the social rented sector (SRS) position to the private rented sector (PRS) position to the same situation of a room of less than 50 square feet being deemed a ‘bedroom’ by the landlord.

Firstly, the PRS landlord claiming a property has 3 bedrooms can and invariably has that property inspected for the validity of such a claim by the independent rent officer service.  The Rent Officer comes out to check and the last yearly figures I have reveal 219,000 yearly inspections.  YET such inspections and the opportunity for these to be conducted on social housing properties was taken away by this government in April 2013 when the bedroom tax started.

For more click here:  SPeye Joe (Welfarewrites)

Eviction Britain: More than half a million face having their homes repossessed

Eviction Britain: More than half a million face having their homes repossessed

‘More than half a million Britons are facing eviction from the homes they own or rent, according to a new analysis of possession claims served on households by the courts during the past year.

The scale of the crisis equates to more than 4,000 households being at risk of losing their home each week, Shelter warned today, while more than 215,000 possession claims have been served on people since April last year.

In some parts of the country the situation is so bad that one in 34 households is in danger of being repossessed, according to the charity’s analysis of county court records from England between April 2013 and March 2014.’

Read more: Eviction Britain: More than half a million face having their homes repossessed

Revealed: Why millions WON’T get the £155 new state pension they’re expecting

‘As many as four in five older workers could miss out on the full flat-rate state pension of £155 a week when it is introduced in 2016.
And millions face losing thousands of pounds in inflation-linked increases on company pensions.

The devastating blows, which throw into chaos the plans of those within two years of retirement, have been revealed in a Money Mail investigation into the small print of the new flat-rate pension.

A major pledge of the new pension was that everyone who had paid all their National Insurance contributions would be guaranteed to get £155 a week.

But we have uncovered a series of nasty surprises that are highly complex and technical. And they are likely to mean that many who expected to get the new £155 payout could get far less — and, disturbingly, not even the Government has calculated how much less.’

Read more …